jon rafman essay

self and, with success, entertain sexual fetishes in the virtual world. Bewildering and terrifying, Jons investigations into desire leave you feeling dirty, invigorated and thrilled that artists like this exist. I've been developing this idea of using the language of what I call the "troll cave" - the spaces of people who spend all their time online, in front of their computers. It wasn't even fetishising it; it was showing how it was a banal part of our world, which I think now has been accepted, whilst then that was very new. The mixture comfort and discomfort.



jon rafman essay

This Is Where It Ends: The Denouement of Post-Internet Art in Jon Rafmans Deep Web by Saelan Twerdy, Momus, 2015.
23 featuring a cover work by artist Jon Rafman introduced by an in depth essay by Bret Schneider.

Rather than simply conflating his findings in video games and memes and weird corners of the digital landscape, Jon weaves them into pieces that feel like fables or entirely new works, which make us question ourselves and the very nature of art. Everything with Jon is so carefully designed as to make each element feel as natural but dissonant as possible: reality becomes fiction and everything feels somehow frightening. "Jon Rafman's Surreal Google Street View Accidents (photos.

Still Life (Betamale 2013, a Man Digging, 2013 9-Eyes, ongoing, remember Carthage, 2013. Visitors can take a seat in one of the furniture sculptures, or even isolate themselves completely from the museums public, losing themselves in a world of avatars, online subcultures, and fetish communities in the far-flung corners of the web. "Jon Rafman: Mapping Google - Canadian Art". Artforum 500 words, 2014, interview with Pin-Up, 2013, interview with New York Times Mag, 2013. 1, he is widely known for exhibiting found images from. His work is frequently populated by obsessive characters whose lives revolve around gaming and other digital activities, and who are possessed by a hyper-individualized mindset that exists somewhere between real life and digital reality. Vomit and cigarette ends and debris strewn around a computer keyboard and a bedroom reduced to grimy detritus are seen while ominous voices suggest the omnipresence and omnipotence of screens and a sort of frightening unreality that turns domestic spaces into nightmares. That made some of the work radical, but it's been absorbed by culture now, so yeah, it means something different. Containing a vast array of images culled through Google Street View, the artist presents situations odd, grim, at times alarming randomly caught on camera m, publication, a monograph published by the Zabludowicz Collection, London, will accompany the exhibition, with texts by Kevin McGarry, Maitreyi Maheshwari. Palais de Tokyo.